Bikes Without Borders

Bikes Without Borders is a Toronto-based charitable organization that uses bikes as a tool for development and social change, addressing issues of poverty, education and healthcare. Together we can change the world, one bike at a time... VISIT US
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Posts tagged "maternal health"

womensenews:

Morocco has blazed a reputation as a can-do country when it comes to improving its maternal health statistics. 

#TGIF! Beautiful Malawi 

Not sure what to get for mom?  Check out the awesome deals and coupons on gifts bikeswithoutborders.we-care.com!

We at Bikes Without Borders have a trusted partnership with We-Care.com. Your purchase through this site helps us use bikes as tools for development in marginalized communities.

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Every mother deserves a happy and healthy life, and we at Bikes Without Borders are dedicated to the cause of maternal health and safe childbirth.  

  • Around the world, one woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable. 
  • Malawi has one of the highest maternal death rates in the world. In 2001, the UN set a goal to decrease maternal mortality by 75% by 2015, but it is nowhere near meeting that target.

There are 3 main causes in the delay of healthcare:

  1. Delay in deciding to seek medical care, due lack of access to proper transportation as well as cultural perspectives on pregnancy (a taboo topic).
  2. Delay in reaching a healthcare facility mainly related to transport and mobility issues.
  3. Delay in seeking care due to quality of healthcare received when facility is reached.

By providing bicycles and bicycle ambulances to marginalized communities in Malawi, community healthcare workers and volunteers are able to significantly increase their efficiency in dispensing healthcare.

Health Centres give priority to patients who arrive on the bicycle-ambulance since they are well informed about the emergency nature of its use. Rural Malawians are more likely to seek medical care when there is access to transportation because there is less fear of being a burden upon their family (do not need to be carried by foot on a makeshift stretcher for 15km).

»  Support our project and you would be literally saving the life of a mother and her child this Mother’s Day  «

genderacrossborders:

“If you ever find yourself in rural Tanzania, you might come across men, women and adolescents proudly wearing a T-shirt with this quote: “It Is Possible To Reduce Maternal and Newborn Deaths, Play Your Role.” As one of many educational campaigns carried out by Fly! Manage Your Family (FLEMAFA), I find that this quote carries a simple but powerful message exemplifying both FLEMAFA’s founding purpose and its impact: women and infants are dying unnecessarily, and all of us — organizations, community leaders, men, women, health workers and youth— can play a role in helping to prevent it.”

-Kimberly Wolf, Program Associate, The Global Fund for Women

To read the full article, click here.

One woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable. 
In 2001, the UN set itself the goal of slashing maternal mortality by 75% by 2015, but it is nowhere near meeting that target.

Malawi has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios (510 deaths per 100 000 live births) in the world. The risks of pregnancy are indicated by the words used to describe a pregnant woman in the local Chichewa language: either pakati (between life and death) ormatenda (sick). In Malawi, behaviour at the village level can contribute to maternal mortality, for example, most births and deaths of pregnant women happen at home,and some behaviours within the community hinder timely and appropriate care-seeking.

Community Healthcare Volunteer Workers ensure that all pregnant mothers are recorded, monitored and encourage safe practices by advocating prenatal and antenatal care, with the provision of nutritional supplements when available. Generally pregnant mothers would not access a healthcare facility to give birth due to the distance from their home that could mean walking 15 km. Many pregnant mothers in Malawi keep their pregnancy secret for fear of losing the child and being a burden upon their family if it is known this could affect their lifestyle. The role of the CHV is crucial since any information shared is confidential. A pregnant mother is far more likely to disclose information to a CHV on a home visit rather than walking 15 km to a healthcare facility where someone from the community might wonder what the purpose of their visit is.

The CareCar Bicycle Ambulance is an excellent way to increase maternal health by ensuring that all pregnant mothers have access to transportation to a health facility when needed. Advocating emergency usage of the CareCar increases the usage and creates a safer environment for mother and child.

genderacrossborders:

Why Women Die
In the developing world, five causes are responsible for nearly three quarters of all maternal deaths. 
To learn more, click here.

genderacrossborders:

Why Women Die

In the developing world, five causes are responsible for nearly three quarters of all maternal deaths.

To learn more, click here.

Why Invest In Women?

united-nations:

In this UNFPA video celebrity musicians have come together to help combat maternal mortality and improve maternal health among women in Cameroon.

Alain Sibenaler, UNFPA Cameroon Representative, explains: “It appears that music and dance are powerful communication tools that can reach the broadest and most varied audience in our country, since they are part of Cameroonian culture.”

 See full story and video here: http://bit.ly/t2q0GU

foodandnutritionsecurity:

Much of the focus from the international community has been on ending child undernutrition and interventions that improve growth and development of kids. One population that has been largely neglected is adolescent girls and young women.

Evidence shows that maternal undernutrition can influence a child’s chances in life by increasing risk of death, but also the child’s growth and development. There is also an increased risk of non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes for children. Scary stuff.  So if a women herself is undernourished, and she gets pregnant, the chances of her child being undernourished, and developing heart disease as an adult are high. Talk about a terrible double misfortune, that is, if the child can survive past her fifth birthday.

But not only is the child at risk. Women who are malnourished are also more susceptible to cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. This is not just a situation of the undernourished where small women who are undernourished give birth to small babies and the cycle continues. This also happens for women who are overweight. Overweight pregnant women can also influence a child’s future fate. Much of this fate occurs in utero before a child is even born (termed programming). There is even a body of evidence linking this programming to the placenta. Again, scary stuff.

If the evidence holds up that maternal malnutrition strongly influences infant health, there is a need for a shift in the way nutritionists and health practitioners do their work and who they are working for.

So what to do? Well, one good starting point is to work with adolescent girls. In many places where there are huge inequities and poverty, girls tend to drop out of school because of household and community demands and sometimes get married off too early. By keeping girls in school and providing nutrition throughout their growth and life cycle, the potential to delay early marriage and pregnancies is greater. And we know that the chance of having a child who is stunted decreases 5% for every year a girl stays in school.

So, as the old adage goes, “A human being is not attaining her full heights until she is educated.”

“A human being is not attaining her full heights until she is educated.”

fyeahafrica:

The mortality rate of mothers and children born in Malawi is staggering.

The number of women who die in childbirth in Malawi is nearly a hundred times higher than the ration in the United Kingdom and other developed countries. The Safe Motherhood Malawi project was developed for Malawian mothers, educating midwives to train community-based health workers to improve midwifery knowledge and care.

Captured by Paolo Patruno, a photographer focused on humanitarian issues and social documentary while working with Non-Profit Organization. Patruno documents the lives of these women and their newborn children.

via ADA

Bikes Without Borders has partnered with YONECO to help strengthen global connections to local Malawian communities. Partnering with YONECO allows resources (access to information, pharmaceuticals, transportation, etc.) to be maximized with the establishment of effective working relationships by YONECO. 

Goal: To increase the health of Malawians and to contribute towards the reduction of the spread of HIV infection, mitigating the impact of AIDS to promote quality care for the infected and infected.

Purpose: To promote self-seliance in material and psychological support, empowering and active participation of care givers, orphans and vulnerable children, the aged and other vulnerable groups in reducing the spread of HIV infection and mitigating the impact of AIDS.

Objectives: 
• To promote quality care within the home setting
• To enhance communities commitment to responding to the needs of infected and affected
• To reduce stigma and discrimination for the affected and infected
• To develop effective monitoring and evaluation systems for the home-based care programme


(Kachulu Health Centre visit with Fresco, the Health Worker extraordinaire)

Strategies:
• Life skills development for the orphans, people living with AIDS, volunteers and care givers at community level.
• Comprehensive health education programme on HIV/AIDS issues and other related issues at community level.
• Screening for HIV/AIDS and TB
• Community care of people living with HIV/AIDS, old people, chronically ill, orphans and other vulnerable groups at local level


(HIV/AIDS workshop literature for Community Health Volunteers.)

VISIT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

Around the world, one woman dies every minute during childbirth, yet almost all of these deaths are preventable.  Malawi has one of the highest maternal death rates in the world.

In 2001, the UN set a goal to decrease maternal mortality by 75% by 2015, but it is nowhere near meeting that target.

Our Phase 2 in Malawi, will support Community Healthcare Volunteer Workers delivering vital health services. We will have an increased focus to address issues of maternal health, providing them with new bikes and providing community health organizations with bike ambulances (which CHWs can sign out and use as needed). 

In a country where a staggering number of women die in child birth, the BBC’s Karen Allen discovers one Malawian village where a novel solution – a bicycle ambulance – has apparently helped to wipe out the problem.” – BBC news

Information session for expecting mothers

How you can be part of the solution: 
1. Spread the word - tell your friends about the issues and the project so that there is more awareness in different communities and professional fields.
2. Brainstorm ideas - discuss possible solutions and share your ideas with friends, family & coworkers. Sharing knowledge helps start meaningful discussions in the community
3. Volunteer and attend BWB events - to be a part of something meaningful and meet like-minded people from different fields. Every volunteer makes a huge difference.
4. Donate, because funds are always needed - a replacement set of tires for a Community Health Worker in Malawi costs $50, a new bike for a CHW is $150, and a bike ambulance (wheeled stretcher that attaches to a bike) for a community in Malawi is $450

To know more about the Pedal Powered Hope Project visit http://bikeswithoutborders.org/international-programs

Sign up for the BWB newsletter, Like us on Facebook & Follow us on Twitter - keep in touch!

"Every minute a child is born with HIV. However a treatment does exist. We can stop HIV transmission from mothers to children."

learnchange:

4 Dec 2011
A bad thing:
Decades of neglect, a failing health system and remote mountainous topography have created a “crisis in maternal health” in Papua New Guinea, where some 250 women are still dying for every 100,000 live births.
Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/report.aspx?reportid=94352

learnchange:

4 Dec 2011

A bad thing:

Decades of neglect, a failing health system and remote mountainous topography have created a “crisis in maternal health” in Papua New Guinea, where some 250 women are still dying for every 100,000 live births.

Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/report.aspx?reportid=94352

Bike and CareCar distribution to a women’s group

Photos of Bikes Without Borders on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/18699430